Tuesday, February 21, 2017

HaSS SA Conference



Image above: A fantasy front page!!


The HaSS SA Conference was held at Uni SA (Magill Campus) on 25 February, 2017. Here are some of the presentations from the day.

The Place of HaSS in the Curriculum keynote


Let's be Civil workshop


Thinking HaSS workshop




Some useful HaSS links

Spatialworlds
GeogSpace
AC History Units
Geogaction
DECD Learning Resources for Australian Curriculum
DECD Achievement Standards Charts 
Australian Geography Teachers' Association website

Geography Teachers Association of South Australia
History Teachers Association of South Australia
History Teachers Association of Australia
Legal Education Teachers Association SA (LETASA)
Business Educators Australia

Email contact:
malcolm.mcinerney@sa.gov.au


* The Australian Curriculum Portal




A selection of HASS resources and links

 Being a Citizen: a resource for Civics and Citizenship programming



 South Australian Parliament teaching resources



* The role of juries eBook (DECD Outreach Education)



* Suffragettes site (DECD Outreach Education)


Discovering Democracy resources 

* Parliamentary Education Office resources





AC History Units: the resource from HTAA and Education Services Australia (ESA) to support the Australian Curriculum: History





* DECD Australian Curriculum: HASS resources 

The DECD "Making the Australian Curriculum work for us' resource has been designed  to support the teaching and learning of the Australian Curriculum: HASS.

As you can see below the resource to date includes a creative animation, broadsheets on the curriculum, sound bites and 'talking heads'.

The Story of the learning areas animation. An excellent animation on 'What is Geography for'



The HaSS curriculum, year by year, all on one page in the Learning Area Explorer.





Achievement Standards Charts and activities (soon to be updated for HaSS F-7)



* The RSLSA Virtual War Memorial

A great resource for commemoration activities, historical research and work on Australian identity in the Civics and Citizenship curriculum.




* Changing Worlds: The South Australian Story (DECD Outreach Education resource)


 
* South Australian Aboriginal Cultural Studies Curriculum
http://dlb.sa.edu.au/tlsmoodle/
Click on ACS Aboriginal Cultural Studies course and then in the next screen,
enter password in reverse as mentioned.

* DECD Outreach Education



Some other useful DECD Outreach Education resources for the teaching of HaSS

Muslim Cameleers website: (South Australian Museum)




Curator’s Table: German migrants experiences in Australia during World War I web based resource:




iPad inquiry trails to be undertaken on site at the South Australian Maritime Museum:








Monday, October 24, 2016

We have issues

























The issue of what is an issue ... and selecting an issue for your oral

The study of social issues raises the questions as to what actually is an issue and how do you discuss them in the classroom. It can be said that at the local, national or global level, an issue involves considering the following:

• Dispute is the essence of any issue.

• Issues often involve contending groups of people with conflicting opinions.

• The hardest part of any study is selecting an appropriate issue. Issues selected for discussion must show clearly conflicting elements and involve choices decided from a range of alternatives.

• The investigation of an issue must consider the roles and perceptions of stakeholders (various groups in those places and other significant groups elsewhere) that have a vested interest in the issue.

An example of an issue is:
'Should the age of drinking alcohol be increased.'

To help you with your choice of an issue, here are some websites dedicated to exploring and providing information on issues. It would be a useful exercise for you to look at as many issues as possible before deciding on the final topic to conduct your oral. Remember, it is OK to choose an issue specific to the content of the Australian Curriculum: HASS - but make sure that it is an issue that will lead to some good discussion/conversation. I will give you the chance to nominate your topic next Tuesday on the excursion - I do not want any issues repeated during the workshop in the last week when you present your oral.

Here are some of the sites to explore:

* Find out the facts on a wide range of issues at http://www.encyclopedia.com

* Research issues at the Social Issue Research Centre at http://www.sirc.org

* Investigate a catalogue of issues at http://www.dmoz.org/Society/Issues

* Global issues http://www.globalissues.org/ 

* A resource with summaries of many issues http://spinneypress.co

* Human Rights issues http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Pages/ListofIssues.aspx






Saturday, October 22, 2016

Have another look at the learning theories for your commentary in the unit plan



Related sites to Humsteach blog

Australian Curriculum Portal
Geogaction
DECD Learning Resources for Australian Curriculum
DECD Achievement Standards Charts 
Australian Geography Teachers' Association website

Geography Teachers Association of South Australia
History Teachers Association of South Australia
History Teachers Association of Australia 

Scoop.it 




Email contact:
malcolm.mcinerney@flinders.edu.au    


* The FLO address for this course is https://flo.flinders.edu.au/course/view.php?id=37524


I have placed the tutorial presentation on the Geography, History and Civics and Citizenship curriculum for next week up on the FLO site at https://flo.flinders.edu.au/course/view.php?id=37524. Please go through during the week so that you are prepared for the tutorial next week.



Let's talk theory for a while


It is important  in your commentary for the unit plan that you refer to learning theories. I know you have done a lot on learning theories during your studies but I thought it was worth reminding you about the importance of referencing them when you are designing the learning for students

A site to check out about learning theories is at http://www.learning-theories.com


In the Australian Curriculum you will see many learning theories in action via the inquiry model used in HaSS




Constructivism

The philosophy about learning, that proposes learners need to build their own understanding of new ideas, has been labelled constructivism.

Various educationalist have developed an instructional model for constructivism, called the "Five E’s"



Explore

Students carry out an activity/discussion in which they can explore the knowledge/concept/skill. This phase allows students to acquire a common set of experiences that they can use to help each other make sense of the new concept or skill.

Explain

Only after students have explored aspects of the knowledge/concept/skill does the teacher provide the explanations/learning stories to develop student understanding. The significant aspect of this phase is that explanation follows experience.

Elaborate

This phase provides opportunities for students to apply what they have learned to new situations and so develop a deeper understanding of the concept/understanding. It is important for students to discuss and compare their ideas with each other during this phase. 

Evaluate

The final phase provides an opportunity for students to review and reflect on their own learning and new understandings. It is also when students provide evidence for changes to their understanding, beliefs and skills. 

 Blooms taxonomy

Some other learning theories to refer to in HaSS:


·        Multiple Intelligences

·        Systems thinking

·        Experiential learning

Sunday, September 25, 2016

Inquiring about inquiry


The questions are: 

On the ‘teller’/Inquiry spectrum I am …

To be successful Inquiry needs to be ...

What are the stages of Inquiry in the Australian Curriculum: Geography?
  
What are the stages of Inquiry in the Australian Curriculum: History?

What are the advantages for learning of the Inquiry approach?

What are some of the issues to keep in mind when planning an inquiry approach?

I think there is far too much emphasis on inquiry approaches in the classroom

Inquiry does not necessarily improve learning.

Why can it be said that Inquiry has the potential to be abused in the classroom.


Related sites to Humsteach blog

Australian Curriculum Portal
Geogaction
DECD Learning Resources for Australian Curriculum
DECD Achievement Standards Charts 
Australian Geography Teachers' Association website

Geography Teachers Association of South Australia
History Teachers Association of South Australia
History Teachers Association of Australia 

Scoop.it 



Email contact:
malcolm.mcinerney@flinders.edu.au    


* The FLO address for this course is https://flo.flinders.edu.au/course/view.php?id=37524


The FLO page for Middle Years HASS and the Generic specialisation is now ready for submission of assignments and other key information.



Teacher support for inquiry

In viewing numerous classroom scenarios on inquiry, we see the principle of inductive reasoning at the center of the teacher’s approach. Students begin with a source – a cup or a dress and their thinking and reasoning is guided to begin firstly with the particular and then branching out to the more general.

Inductive reasoning means restricting oneself to sources and then formulating statements based on them. Sources are used as a starting point to inquiry, - further research will hopefully result from this activity. The kind of research the students will be carrying out will be inductive as they will be establishing facts directly referred to by the sources and they will be making inferences from the sources they are working with and researching further.

Principle number 1. Start with the particular, move out to the general. Otherwise the opposite of this is deductive reasoning which consists in passing from the ‘the universal’ to ‘the particular’. It is less likely that a primary school student will know how to draw conclusions from certain general truths.

The second principle that underpins this type of inquiry is active, student centred learning – but well supported and scaffolded by the teacher. It’s what Webster calls “light assistance”. Pedagogically speaking the approach is robust – it sits very much within a context of social constructivism. The interaction between you and the student is crucial even though you may think this approach is all about handing over responsibility for learning to the student. Yes, that’s partly true. Good inquiry methodology results in the interaction between adult and student guiding student thinking (From Sage on the Stage to Guide on the Side). Teachers have a vital role to play developing effective inquiry learning which includes initiating good questions to research and to analyse and to come up with reasoned meaningful conclusions. By promoting active learning – that is not just doing but thinking-- in classrooms the learning outcomes are more likely to become intellectually embedded says Hutchings, “what we discover, we retain”

The third principle underpinning inquiry learning is the use of open ended questioning, resulting in deep levels of engagement with problems that are likely to be multifaceted and complex. Its nature is exploratory (Hutchings, 2007). Hutchings says that the core of inquiry is the question and it is in the formulation and ‘or the analysis of that question that the important initial intellectual activity takes place. Philosophically it is a Socratic based activity - Socratic perception that our knowledge is formed by questions.

Students participate in acts of discovery, grappling with different ways of looking at ideas and issues and thinking creatively about problems that do not necessarily have simple answers.

The 'Instructional Strategies online' site succinctly sums up inquiry methodology when it says:

Using inquiry, students become actively involved in the learning process as they:

* act upon their curiosity and interests;
* develop questions;
* think their way through controversies or dilemmas;
* look at problems analytically;
* inquire into their preconceptions and what they already know;
* develop, clarify, and test hypotheses; and,
* draw inferences and generate possible solutions.

Inquiring, not telling!



Related sites to Humsteach blog

Australian Curriculum Portal
Geogaction
DECD Learning Resources for Australian Curriculum
DECD Achievement Standards Charts 
Australian Geography Teachers' Association website

Geography Teachers Association of South Australia
History Teachers Association of South Australia
History Teachers Association of Australia 

Scoop.it 




Email contact:
malcolm.mcinerney@flinders.edu.au    


* The FLO address for this course is https://flo.flinders.edu.au/course/view.php?id=37524


The FLO page for Middle Years HASS and the Generic specialisation is now ready for submission of assignments and other key information.


Spatialworlds posting on inquiring to read
 
 * Inquiring about inquiry with the Australian Curriculum: Geography.


*  Back to the future with inquiry questions



It is more than telling!

Inquiry (in UK they talk about enquiry) is a word that is frequently thrown around when 21st Century curriculum is being developed.

The thinking is that students will be more connected to their learning and engaged to explore if they are stimulated to think via a range of inquiry questions on a topic/area of study:

"Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand." Joe Exline

Inquiry implies involvement that leads to understanding. Furthermore, involvement in learning implies possessing skills and attitudes that enable students to seek resolutions to questions and issues while constructing new knowledge. Useful application of inquiry learning involves several factors: a context for questions, a framework for questions, a focus for questions, and different levels of questions.

Inquiry Based Learning has fast become an accepted way for curriculum to be written, with student exploration, engagement and empowerment seen as positive outcomes.

However there needs to be a caveat to the use of Inquiry Based Learning in the curriculum. It is not a stand-alone approach but rather an approach which relies on an infrastructure of skills, thinking and foundation knowledge to ensure that the inquiry has rigour, veracity and sound conceptual understandings – it needs to be informed inquiry and not just ‘off-the top of the head emoting’ or ramblings based on minimal or uninformed, if not biased sources.

There is a potential for Inquiry Based Learning to be mis-used and abused by teachers without the skills, knowledge or understanding themselves on a particular geographical topic. 

‘Geographical inquiry refers to the methodologies that geographers use to find new knowledge, or knowledge that is new to them, and the ways that they attempt to understand and explain what they have observed’

Naturally technology has a huge part to play in the development of a rigorous and valid inquiry methodology in the humanities. http://www.edutopia.org/lesson-planning-inquiry-modeling

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

The theories of learning



Related sites to Humsteach blog

Australian Curriculum Portal
Geogaction
DECD Learning Resources for Australian Curriculum
DECD Achievement Standards Charts 
Australian Geography Teachers' Association website

Geography Teachers Association of South Australia
History Teachers Association of South Australia
History Teachers Association of Australia 

Scoop.it 




Email contact:
malcolm.mcinerney@flinders.edu.au    


* The FLO address for this course is https://flo.flinders.edu.au/course/view.php?id=37524


The FLO page for Middle Years HASS and the Generic specialisation is now ready for submission of assignments and other key information.


The tutorial presentation on the Geography curriculum for Week 11 (week 5 of the course). Please go through during the weeks I am away so that you are prepared for the tutorial in week 11.



Let's talk theory for a while


It is important  in your rationale for your lesson plan and unit plan that you refer to learning theories. I know you have done a lot on learning theories during your studies but I thought it was worth reminding you about the importance of referencing them when you are designing the learning for students

A site too check out about learning theories is at http://www.learning-theories.com


In the Australian Curriculum you will see many learning theories in action via the inquiry model used in HaSS




Constructivism

The philosophy about learning, that proposes learners need to build their own understanding of new ideas, has been labelled constructivism.

Various educationalist have developed an instructional model for constructivism, called the "Five E’s"



Explore

Students carry out an activity/discussion in which they can explore the knowledge/concept/skill. This phase allows students to acquire a common set of experiences that they can use to help each other make sense of the new concept or skill.

Explain

Only after students have explored aspects of the knowledge/concept/skill does the teacher provide the explanations/learning stories to develop student understanding. The significant aspect of this phase is that explanation follows experience.

Elaborate

This phase provides opportunities for students to apply what they have learned to new situations and so develop a deeper understanding of the concept/understanding. It is important for students to discuss and compare their ideas with each other during this phase. 

Evaluate

The final phase provides an opportunity for students to review and reflect on their own learning and new understandings. It is also when students provide evidence for changes to their understanding, beliefs and skills. 

 Blooms taxonomy

Some other learning theories to refer to in HaSS:


·        Multiple Intelligences

·        Systems thinking

·        Experiential learning